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Hearing Test

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About this test
Soundly worked with audiologists and sound engineers to create a simple hearing screener that you can take in 5 minutes. This test isn't a replacement for seeing a professional in person but it offers a good place to start. Most of our users find that the Soundly screener generally mirrors their clinical results.
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More About The Test

Written by
Amy Sarow, AuD, CCC-A

After trialing every online hearing test we could find, our team felt some things were still missing. Specifically, we wanted a simple interface that returned an audiogram-style chart similar to what you get at an audiologist's office.

Development And Design

Soundly's hearing test was built with a team of audiologists, designers, web developers, and a PhD in sound engineering. The test has been featured in the LA Times, Seattle Times, Hearing Review, and CNET. Forbes Health Advisory ranked Soundly's test as a "top recommendation to patients looking for online hearing test options."
The video below shows Soundly's test in action.

What to Expect

Our online hearing test aims to provide comprehensive, detailed results similar to what a healthcare provider would observe. Unlike other online tests that offer limited insights and refer you to a provider, our test results are designed to resemble an audiogram.

It's important to note that while this tool isn't a replacement for a thorough in-office hearing test, it is a valuable starting point in understanding your hearing health. The results derived from our test not only provide crucial information about your hearing condition but also guide your treatment options.

✓ Questionnaire 

The test begins with a short questionnaire with "red flag" symptoms. Using your answers, the test will indicate whether we suggest you see an audiologist immediately.

✓ Headphones and Noise

We recommend that you take the test with a pair of decent headphones. Any quality headphones, including Samsung, Bose, AirPods, JBL, Sony, Beats, and Anker, will suffice. We recommend finding a relatively quiet place in your home before beginning the test. Background noise could impact your results.

✓ Calibration

The test will prompt you to take your headphones off and rub your hands together closely in front of your nose, quickly and firmly. Now, put your headphones back on and adjust your volume to match the volume of your hands rubbing together. Firmly rubbing your hands generates a predictable volume that we'll use to ensure you start the screening at the right volume.

✓ Test and Results

The Soundly test measures how well you hear at varying frequencies. Drag each slider to the point where you can faintly hear the sound. At the end of the test, you will receive an audiogram-style chart and insights on your hearing loss.

How to Use Your Results

What can you do after taking the test? Your test results give you an idea of your hearing loss, which may influence the treatment options you decide to pursue. Over-the-counter (OTC) devices might be sufficient to provide some benefit in certain situations for mild to moderate hearing loss.

However, if the test results indicate a more severe level of hearing loss, it would be advisable to seek prescription hearing treatment. This option is typically more comprehensive and personalized, accommodating the specific complexities of your hearing condition.

Prescription-level care is an option for any degree of hearing loss, but especially important for anyone with severe-profound hearing loss. Remember, these results serve as a guide for getting started, but at any time you could consult with a professional for a complete evaluation.

Soundly hearing tests provide you with the information you need to make an informed decision about your hearing health in a free and accessible way. Get your results with one easy test.

Some questions before we begin.

Have you recently had a significant change in hearing loss?
Are you experiencing pain in your ears?
Are you suffering from dizziness or vertigo?
Have you recently suffered an injury or blow to the head?
Have your ears actively leaked fluid in the last 90 days?
Do you currently have visible earwax buildup?
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Based on your answers we recommend you see an ENT doctor or audiologist.

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Are you in a quiet room? Noises like traffic, conversation or appliances will affect your result.

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You’ll need headphones to take this test.

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Let’s get your volume set to the correct levels.

Calibration Step 1 of 2

First, take your headphones off and rub your hands together closely in front of your nose, quickly and firmly.
Why hand rubbing?
Firmly rubbing your hands generates a predictable volume that we’ll use to make sure you start the screening at the right volume.
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Let’s get your volume set to the correct levels.

Calibration Step 2 of 2

Now put your headphones back on and adjust your volume to match the volume of your hands rubbing together.
Calibration Track
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We’ll start with your left ear.

Move each slider individually, either directly or with the "+" or "-" buttons, to the quietest sound you can hear.

Testing your left ear

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Now let's test your right ear.

Move each slider individually, either directly or with the "+" or "-" buttons, to the quietest sound you can hear.

Testing your right ear

Quieter
Louder
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Results

How to read your results:

We’ve tested your hearing across 6 frequencies from lowest to highest. The lowest points in the line are where you have the most hearing loss. Learn how to read an audiogram HERE.

Low-frequency Loss (0 - 750 Hz)
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If you have hearing loss among the lowest range of frequencies (on the left of the chart), you may struggle in group conversations or in noisy environments. Sounds may lose their full quality, and voices may sound "thin."
Mid-frequency Loss (750 - 3000 Hz)
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If you have hearing loss among mid-range frequencies (in the middle of the chart), you may have trouble understanding vowel and consonant sounds like A, R, P, H, CH, G, and SH.
High-frequency Loss (3000 Hz and up)
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If you have hearing loss among higher frequencies (on the right side of the chart), you may have trouble hearing higher-pitched voices like women and children or consonant sounds like K, F, S, TH.
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It looks like you have some hearing loss. Here's what you can do next.

It looks like you are hearing well. Still curious? Here's what you can do next.

Ask Soundly

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